Politics

Kyiv Residents Left Without Power and Water After Russian Barrage

Published On Wed, 12 Jun 2024
Leela Venkatesh
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KYIV — Facing recurrent power outages, Ukrainian couple Maryna and Valeriy Tkalich have devised strategies to navigate their daily routines. When electricity fails and elevators cease to function, they leave their baby's stroller on the ground floor and carry their two-month-old son up twelve flights of stairs to their apartment.
Anticipating scheduled electricity cutoffs announced by authorities, the Tkaliches rush to bathe their son and prepare meals before lights dim and water supply ceases. These disruptions have become increasingly common for Kyiv's three million residents since late March when Russia targeted the country's energy infrastructure, resulting in a loss of nearly half its generating capacity.
Streets shrouded in darkness, the hum of private generators, and pedestrians carrying flashlights have become familiar sights reminiscent of the winter of 2023. Mr. Valeriy Tkalich, 34, expressed concerns about the water shortage, particularly on higher floors where water pumps rely on electricity. To cope, they've adapted by purchasing a small gas stove for cooking.
With winter approaching and Russian forces intensifying attacks on thermal and hydropower stations, many Ukrainians fear worsening conditions. Moscow defends its actions, considering Ukraine's energy infrastructure a legitimate military target, despite the civilian toll. For the Tkalich family, power cuts pose greater challenges than air raids, prompting them to take precautions for the upcoming seasons. They're considering relocating further west, where missile attacks are less frequent.
As Russia escalates its assault, Kyiv grapples with insufficient air defense systems, exacerbating the damage to power infrastructure. The spring attacks have crippled half of the country's generation capacity, leading to prolonged power shortages. Artist Yevhen Klymenko, a friend of the Tkaliches, adjusts his work schedule to accommodate power disruptions, waking early to paint in natural light. He channels his art to support Ukraine's military, hoping to raise funds for essential equipment.
Reflecting on the dire conditions at the front lines, Klymenko acknowledges the relative insignificance of power outages. Despite the challenges, he remains resolute in his support for Ukraine's cause.
Disclaimer: This image is taken from Reuters.
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